Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His first collection of poems, The Crown Ain't Worth Much was released in 2016 and was nominated for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award. His first collection of essays, They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was released in fall 2017 by Two Dollar Radio. 

Kaveh Akbar is the author of Calling a Wolf a Wolf and the chapbook Portrait of the Alcoholic. Born in Tehran, Iran, he currently teaches at Purdue University and in the low-residency MFA program at Randolph College. 

Cameron Awkward-Rich, a poet and critic, is the author of Sympathetic Little Monster (Ricochet Editions, 2016) and the chapbook Transit (Button Poetry, 2015). A Cave Canem fellow and poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine, his poetry has appeared in Narrative, The Baffler, Indiana Review and elsewhere. Cam received his PhD in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University and is currently a postdoctoral associate with the Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies program at Duke University.

C. Bain is a gender-liminal writer-performer. His full-length poetry collection, Debridement, was a finalist for the 2016 Publishing Triangle Awards. He currently works to create beautiful, interdisciplinary, intersectional performance texts via Tiresias Projekt. He lives in Brooklyn. More at tiresiasprojekt.com.

Destiny O. Birdsong is a poet, fiction writer, and essayist whose work has either appeared or is forthcoming in African American ReviewBettering American Poetry Volume IIThe BreakBeat Poets Volume 2: Black Girl MagicThe Cambridge Companion to Transnational American LiteratureSplit This Rock’s Poem of the WeekstorySouth, and elsewhere. Destiny has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Callaloo, Jack Jones Literary Arts, The Ragdale Foundation, and The MacDowell Colony. Read more at destinybirdsong.com.

Jericho Brown is the recipient of a Whiting Writers Award and of fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the National Endowment for the Arts.  His poems have appeared in The New RepublicThe New York Times, The New Yorker, and The Best American Poetry anthologies.  His first book, Please (New Issues 2008), won the American Book Award. His second book, The New Testament (Copper Canyon 2014), won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. He is an associate professor of English and Creative Writing and the Director of the Creative Writing Program at Emory University in Atlanta. Copper Canyon Press will release his new book, The Tradition, in April of 2019.

Emily Jungmin Yoon is the author of Ordinary Misfortunes (Tupelo Press 2017), winner of the Sunken Garden Chapbook Prize, and A Cruelty Special to Our Species (Ecco Books 2018). Her poems and translations appear or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, POETRY, The Literary Review, The New York Times Magazine, and elsewhere. She has received awards and fellowships from Ploughshares’ Emerging Writer’s Contest, AWP’s WC&C Scholarship Competition, The Home School in Miami, the Aspen Institute, New York University, the University of Chicago, and Money for Women/Barbara Deming Memorial Fund. In 2017, she received the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation. She currently serves as the Poetry Editor for The Margins, the literary magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and is a PhD student in the East Asian Languages and Civilizations Department at the University of Chicago.

Irène Mathieu is a pediatrician, writer, and public health researcher. She is the 2016 winner of the Bob Kaufman Book Prize and Yemassee Journal's Poetry Prize, and author of the book orogeny (Trembling Pillow Press, 2017) and poetry chapbook the galaxy of origins (dancing girl press & studio, 2014). Irène has received fellowships from the Fulbright Program and the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop. She is a poetry book reviewer for Muzzle Magazine, an editor for the Journal of General Internal Medicine's humanities section, and a contributing author on the Global Health Hub blog. Irène holds a BA in International Relations from the College of William & Mary and a MD from Vanderbilt University. She is on the speakers' bureau for Jack Jones Literary Arts and currently resides in Philadelphia.

Rachel McKibbens is a two-time New York Foundation for the Arts poetry fellow and author of blud, Pink Elephant, Into the Dark & Emptying Field, and the chapbook, MAMMOTH. She founded The Pink Door Writing Retreat and co-curates the acclaimed literary series Poetry & Pie Night.

Nicole Sealey: Born in St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. and raised in Apopka, Florida, Nicole Sealey is the author of Ordinary Beast, finalist for the 2018 PEN Open Book Award, and The Animal After Whom Other Animals Are Named, winner of the 2015 Drinking Gourd Chapbook Poetry Prize. Her other honors include a Jerome Foundation Travel and Study Grant, an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant, the Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize from The American Poetry Review, a Daniel Varoujan Award and the Poetry International Prize, as well as fellowships from CantoMundo, Cave Canem, MacDowell Colony and the Poetry Project. Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming to Best American Poetry 2018The New YorkerThe New York Times and elsewhere. Nicole holds an MLA in Africana studies from the University of South Florida and an MFA in creative writing from New York University. She is the executive director at Cave Canem Foundation and the 2018-2019 Doris Lippman Visiting Poet at The City College of New York.